DAVID W. JOHNSON

 

1.  Education:

Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and Education and a Master of Arts degree in Political Science and History.

 

In 2010 I was awarded a Diploma de Honor to Dr. David Johnson by the National University of Engineering, Lima, Peru, for my research of the hydrology, geology, archaeology and geoglyphs of coastal Peru and Chile.

 

 

2.  Teaching Background:

Social studies teacher, Arlington High School, Poughkeepsie, NY for twenty-seven years.  Organized and advised extracurricular activities such as student government, International Club and specialized educational and foreign exchange programs.  Awarded a sabbatical for the1991-92 school year to develop a multi-media communication center where students can combine computer and audio-visual technology to further their education.  Retired from teaching in 1997.

 

Appointed Adjunct Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, May, 1998

 

3.  Specialized Educational Programs:

1984, established Global Learning Inc. (formerly Remote Environments and You, Inc.) to produce and present educational programs on developing nations specializing in environmental and human-interest topics. Programs are presented to numerous schools, universities and organizations throughout the year.

 

4.  Published Manuscripts:

Recent articles have appeared in Maryknoll Magazine, The Outdoor Educator, Clearwater Magazine, Sierra Atlantic, Dutchess Magazine and various Alaskan publications on a variety of topics accompanied by author's photographs.  In 1987 co-authored a book on Venezuela. In April, 1998 Rumbos Magazine (Peru) featured my article on “The Relationship Between the Lines of Nasca and Water Resources”. Since 1998 I have published several articles regarding our research on the geology, hydrology and archaeology of southern Peru and also presented our data at several scientific conferences. In 2009 I completed a book titled Beneath the Nasca Lines and Other Coastal Geoglyphs of Peru and Chile which discusses our research of the hydrology, geology, archaeology and geoglyphs of Peru and Chile’s coastal desert.

 

5.  Photography:

A field photographer specializing in wildlife, wilderness, environmental, cultural and humanitarian photography.  Equipment consists of professional digital cameras to insure the highest quality images. Several organizations and publishers frequently publish my photographs. 

 

6.  Video Productions:

From 1990 to 1996 I produced a video series which explored the challenges confronting developing nations throughout the world.  The videos were used by schools and the UN.  Some cultural groups used the footage to document their customs and traditions.

 

7.  Cultural Experiences: 

Traveled throughout North America, Alaska, East and West Europe, East and West Africa, South America and South Asia specializing in remote areas under a wide variety of conditions.  Life among diverse cultures has provided me with greater insights into human nature, the opportunity to transcend cultural barriers and to experience traditional lifestyles.

 

8.  Archaeology:

I am a National Geoglyph Research and Exploration recipient (1998) for my research on the correlation between geology, hydrology and the Nasca Lines in Peru. I was an Adjunct Research Associate in the Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, for six years during our research in Peru. As a member of the New York State Archaeological Association for 40 years I have worked on sites throughout the Mohawk and Hudson Valleys. Currently, I am president of the Orange County Chapter of the New York State Archaeological Association and am writing a report on a middle to late archaic site. At the same time my research on the correlation between geology, hydrology and the Nasca Lines continues. I was principal investigator for two scientific expeditions in the Rio Grande de Nasca drainage of southern Peru and co director for several others. In 2010 I was awarded a Diploma de Honor to Dr. David Johnson by the National University of Engineering, Lima, Peru, for my research of the hydrology, geology, archaeology and geoglyphs of coastal Peru and Chile. Also in 2010 I received the Meritorious Service Award for contributing to the advancement of New York State Archaeology by the New York State Archeology Association.

 

 

9.  Scientific Research:

            1998 – Served as principal investigator for scientific research on the correlation between the geology, hydrology and Nasca Lines for the Research and Exploration Committee of the National Geographic Society.

 

            2000 – Served as principal investigator for scientific research to located new water resources for the south coast of Peru, which was funded by United States AID.

 

            1998 – 2003 – Served as co director with scientists representing the departments of Geology, Hydrology and Archaeology from the University of Massachusetts. The team conducted eight scientific expeditions to southern Peru mapping the geology, identifying underground water resources and documenting the Nasca Lines.

 

10.  Recent Assignments:

  1989 - The Alaskan Oil Spill:  Photographedd nearly every aspect of the oil spill for various environmental groups and a Global Learning slide presentation on the oil spill.

 

            1990 - Documented the Orma and Pogomo cultures oof Kenya in both video and slide transparencies for a program on the lower Tana River region.  Documented the famine and relief efforts in southern Sudan for Operation Lifeline Sudan, a United Nations relief project, and Maryknoll    Missionaries.

 

            1991 - Traveled to India, Nepal, Thailand, Hong Kong and communist China.  In Nepal, videoed rural and urban lifestyles for the program entitled "Nepal's Emerging Industrial Revolution" as well as Maryknoll Missionary projects.  In Thailand documented Khmer refugee camps along the Cambodian border and Mon refugee camps along the Burmese border for various international organizations; also gathered material for the video series on developing nations.

            1992 - Documented projects for the Africa 2000 NNetwork, a United Nations development program in Cameroon, Burkina Faso, Mali and Senegal.  Then produced four videos and wrote several articles for the United Nations on their projects in West Africa.  Also gathered additional material for the developing nations video series.

 

            1993 - Traveled throughout El Salvador and Guateemala gathering video and slides for the Developing Nations Series; photographed a variety of projects for Maryknoll Missionaries and other organizations.

 

            1994 - Photographed and videoed relief efforts tthroughout Romania for Christian Aid Ministries and the Developing Nations Series.  Also traveled throughout Italy photographing numerous historical sites for textbook publishers.

 

            1995 - Documented women's rights projects throughout Ecuador for the International Women's Conference in Beijing, China for UNIFEM, a United Nations development program.  In Peru and Bolivia photographed a variety of grassroots projects among the rural and urban areas as well as historical and cultural topics for several organizations such as Maryknoll Missionaries, The Population Bureau and Global Learning's Developing Nations Series.

 

            1996 - Examined the water resources of the province of Nasca in southern Peru, which resulted in locating water resources previously unknown to the community.  The study also resulted in the first scientific interpretation of the Lines of Nasca, which have been considered one of the mysteries of the ancient world.  Provided photographs and video to a variety of organizations related to their projects in Peru.

 

            1997 - Continued my examination of the relationship between the Lines of Nazca and subterranean water resources.  The data resulted in the first interpretation of the geoglyphs supported by geological, hydrological and archeological evidence.  In September I was guest speaker at a conference sponsored by the National Institute of Culture at the Regional Museum in Ica, Peru where I discussed my research.  In October I presented a paper, “The Relationship Between The Lines of Nasca and Water Resources,” at the Northeast Conference on Andean Archaeology and Ethnohistory at the University of Maine.  Also in October, Reuter Global News Service featured an article on my research.

 

            1998 - Continued my examination of the relationship between the Lines of Nazca and subterranean water resources with support from the Research and Exploration Committee of the National Geographic Society and the University of Massachusetts.  Served as principal investigator.  Was appointed adjunct research associate to the Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts.  In July I presented my findings to the Institute of Geography in Lima, Peru and in October to the Northeast Conference on Andean Archaeology and Ethnohistory at the University of Binghamton.

 

            1999-2001 - Continued examination of the relationship between the Lines of Nazca and subterranean water resources.  In October I presented my findings to the Northeast Conference on Andean Archaeology and Ethnohistory at the University of Massachusetts.

 

            2002 – 2003 - Our project team continued researching the relationship between the Nasca Lines and groundwater in southern Peru.  A group of scientists and myself conducted preliminary surveys to determine if the Inca also documented groundwater resources in Machu Picchu and Cusco. During August and September I photographed wildlife in the northern Rocky Mountains.

 

            2004 - 2005 - The ongoing investigation of the geology, hydrology, archaeology of the Nasca Lines was expanded along the coast of Peru for 400 miles from Casma in the north to Nasca in the south.  Johnson also expanded his research into northern Chile.

 

            2005 - Several regions were surveyed for groundwater resources and their relationship to the Nasca Lines / coastal geoglyphs in central Peru and northern Chile including a groundwater survey for Arica, Chile.  Johnson began the photographic documentation of wildlife in the Shawangunk Mountains of New York State for the various nature preserves including Minnewaska State Park and Mohonk Preserve.

 

            2006 - Groundwater and archaeological research continued to expand along the coasts of Peru and Chile.  Johnson also photographed Marianist Missionary projects in Malawi and Kenya and continued to document the wildlife of the Shawangunk Mountains.

 

            2007 - Additional groundwater and geoglyph surveys were conducted in Peru. Photo assignments included: documenting the wildlife of the Shawangunk Mountains, various project sites in Nepal for The Mountain Institute and in India for Global Learning.

 

2008 -  Photo assignments included documenting the wildlife of the Shawangunk Mountains in New York State and photographing wildlife in Alaska for Global Learning.

 

2009 - In June I surveyed archaeological sites in northern Arizona. During July and August I surveyed groundwater sources in the Lower Tana River District, coastal island region, Kitui region and Amboseli and Tsavo National Parks in Kenya for the Kenya government, Kenya Red Cross and Orma Culture. Photo assignments included documenting the wildlife of the Shawangunk Mountains in New York State for Mohonk Preserve and Minnewaska State Park, as well as photographing wildlife in Kenya for Global Learning. In 2009 I completed a book titled Beneath the Nasca Lines and Other Coastal Geoglyphs of Peru and Chile which discusses our research of the hydrology, geology, archaeology and geoglyphs of Peru and Chile’s coastal desert.

 

2010 – During August and September I returned to Peru to work with two projects. The first was with the Mountain Institute photographing the Paramo wetlands of the Andes Mountains in northern Peru. The photographs are being used to promote preservation of this endangered pristine ecosystem. Then I completed a survey of the Santa Cruz and Trancas Valleys in the Grand River drainage. During the year documentation of the wildlife of the Shawangunk Mountains in New York State continued. 

 

 

11.  Summary:

 

Combining the skills of an educator, researcher, author and photographer, in addition to a variety of experiences, provides me with a diverse background which can assist your organization in achieving its goals.